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Archive for September, 2013

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Dear friend,

I would like to tell you that I ordered this book (with exactly the same cover) two days ago and I can’t wait to receive it. It will take a month, I guess… but it will be mine sooner or later. Furthermore, today I watched the movie for a second time and I am speechless. 

Love,

Poppy

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So, here is the review:

Charlie is an outsider, a typical wallflower. He gets bullied at school and prefers taking the forty minute walk home instead of the school bus. Charlie is sixteen years old and when he starts high school, his life is going to change forever.

Isn’t this a familiar set-up, don’t we already know these stories where the loser turns out to be the really cool, popular guy? Well all this is true too for The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky, but just wait and you will find so much more. This book is going to catch and surprise you every time you turn a page.

In a series of letters written by Charlie and sent to an anonymous person we learn about his life, his new friends, his family and especially Charlie himself. He writes about school and his English teacher, Bill, who gives Charlie extra books to read. Charlie then writes essays about them. He would like to become a writer some day.

Charlie himself is a mystery. He has mental problems, gets angry, sees things and then passes out. Right before he started high school his best friend shot himself, but there is also another, worse reason for his problems. At school Charlie meets Patrick and Sam, both of whom are outsiders too, just cooler ones. Patrick is gay and before his stepsister Sam introduced him to “good” music, he was a popular kid. They introduce Charlie to all kinds of new things. Parties, drugs and rock music become new parts of Charlie’s life and for the first time he knows what it really means to have good friends.

What makes this book so special and authentic is its reality. As an adult it takes you back to when you were a teenager, as a child it shows you what lies ahead and as a teenager it inspires you. And as we all know there is no other time when finding out who you are and where you belong to is more immediate than when you are a teenager.

This book is worth it. You must read it.

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Once on a yellow piece of paper with green lines 
he wrote a poem 
And he called it “Chops” 
because that was the name of his dog 
And that’s what it was all about 
And his teacher gave him an A 
and a gold star 
And his mother hung it on the kitchen door 
and read it to his aunts 
That was the year that Father Tracy 
took all the kids to the zoo 
And he let them sing on the bus 
And his little sister was born 
with tiny toenails and no hair 
And his mother and father kissed a lot 
And the girl around the corner sent him a 
valentine signed with a row of X’s 
and he had to ask his father what the X’s meant 
And his father always tucked him in bed at night 
And was always there to do it 

Once on a piece of white paper with blue lines 
he wrote a poem 
And he called it “Autumn” 
because that was the name of the season 
And that’s what it was all about 
And his teacher gave him an A 
and asked him to write more clearly 
And his mother never hung it on the kitchen door 
because of its new paint 
And the kids told him 
that Father Tracy smoked cigars 
And left butts on the pews 
And sometimes they would burn holes 
That was the year his sister got glasses 
with thick lenses and black frames 
And the girl around the corner laughed 
when he asked her to go see Santa Claus 
And the kids told him why 
his mother and father kissed a lot 
And his father never tucked him in bed at night 
And his father got mad 
when he cried for him to do it. 

Once on a paper torn from his notebook 
he wrote a poem 
And he called it “Innocence: A Question” 
because that was the question about his girl 
And that’s what it was all about 
And his professor gave him an A 
and a strange steady look 
And his mother never hung it on the kitchen door 
because he never showed her 
That was the year that Father Tracy died 
And he forgot how the end 
of the Apostle’s Creed went 
And he caught his sister making out on the back porch 
And his mother and father never kissed 
or even talked 
And the girl around the corner 
wore too much makeup 
That made him cough when he kissed her 
but he kissed her anyway 
because that was the thing to do 
And at three A.M. he tucked himself into bed 
his father snoring soundly 

That’s why on the back of a brown paper bag 
he tried another poem 
And he called it “Absolutely Nothing” 
Because that’s what it was really all about 
And he gave himself an A 
and a slash on each damned wrist 
And he hung it on the bathroom door 
because this time he didn’t think 
he could reach the kitchen.

 

 

― Stephen Chbosky, The Perks of Being a Wallflower

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I shut my eyes and all the world drops dead;
I lift my lids and all is born again.
(I think I made you up inside my head.)

The stars go waltzing out in blue and red,
And arbitrary blackness gallops in:
I shut my eyes and all the world drops dead.

I dreamed that you bewitched me into bed
And sung me moon-struck, kissed me quite insane.
(I think I made you up inside my head.)

God topples from the sky, hell’s fires fade:
Exit seraphim and Satan’s men:
I shut my eyes and all the world drops dead.

I fancied you’d return the way you said,
But I grow old and I forget your name.
(I think I made you up inside my head.)

I should have loved a thunderbird instead;
At least when spring comes they roar back again.
I shut my eyes and all the world drops dead.
(I think I made you up inside my head.)

— Sylvia Plath

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